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Wednesday, August 29, 2018

New Workout Gear with a Greenstyle Lille Tank and Super Gs

I have been sewing activewear again...  One inspiration led to another, and before I knew it, I had an entire outfit. It all started when Leah Kimberly from Little Roots posted an inspiration photo of some tights that she wanted to replicate with the Greenstyle Super G pattern. I immediately knew what fabric I wanted to make them in and what I needed to do. I couldn't get her inspiration picture out of my head and had to carve out some time this past weekend to make them. I love the rush when I am feeling inspired!


Once I finished the tights, I also wanted a new top to go with them, but I needed something quick. It was around 10 p.m. that night, and I really wanted to get to bed at a decent hour. So, I printed off the Greenstyle Lille Pattern and made my first! Let me just say that it will not be my last. 


The Lille is a racerback top that also has an optional shelf bra and comes in dress lengths as well. It also has the option for a woven skirt with pockets. I was crunched for time so I didn't get to make the shelf bra option on this one, but I can't wait until I can make another Lille with the shelf bra. 


The Lille comes together quick and uses binding to finish the armholes and neckline. I think binding gives it such a clean finish! 


Now back to the Super G tights... I initially blogged about them when they released in March this year. You can read that post here. After blogging about them, I went on to make a black capri pair that I wear all the time. I also tried out a white pair, but that did not go as planned because I did not realize just how see through the white fabric was so that pair won't make it out of the house. Yikes!

On this purple pair, I made View B in the 26 inch inseam (for my short 5'2" self) with the high rise waist option. I modified them to have this fun side ruching on the pocket panels. If you want to hack a pair of Super Gs like this too, I have written a full tutorial here on how to do the modification. Here is a side-by-side photo of me and my inspiration:

The photo on the left is my version. On the right (the barefoot photo) is the inspiration photo that Leah posted on Facebook.  I think I came pretty close!



How is mine different from my inspiration, though? Mine has pockets. BIG pockets that fit my BIG phone that has an Otter box so my kids do not drown it. Also, mine has the SUPER gusset that goes from calf to calf so if I need to use my ninja moves I am ready. Lastly, mine were made by me. What is it about handmade clothing that makes me feel so satisfied?


I wore these all day yesterday and I could not stop feeling of the side panel. It feels so cool! I am so glad that athleisure is in style because I did not want to take these off! I normally need to grade out a size for my calves on tights, but I did not need to for this pair because the gathered fabric gave me that extra amount of ease that I need for comfort around my calves. 


I am sure you can tell which one is me.... Thanks to my lack of tan!! 


Resources

Tights Pattern: Greenstyle Super G Tights
Tights Modification: On the Greenstyle blog 
Tank Pattern: Greenstyle Lille Tank

Thank you so much for reading my blog, and I hope I have inspired you! You may follow me on Instagram or receive updates by liking my page on Facebook. If you want to take a look into the things that inspire me, you can follow me on Pinterest. You may also follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Disclosures: This post may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small compensation when you purchase via my link. There is no cost to you, and it allows me to continue to tell you all about my latest favorite sewing finds.  

Photo Credit: my sweet daughter, Abigail, who is 9

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Tween Sewing with the Ellie and Mac Girl's Cold Shoulder Top


Do you have a tween to sew for? Google tells me that a "tween" is a person between the ages of 8 and 12. My 9 year old loves for me to sew for her still (thankfully!). I definitely feel that over the last year, though, she has become much more opinionated on what she wants me to sew her vs. purchase. I have also learned to ask her before signing her up as a model for a pattern test. She was previously not as opinionated in her style and was very happy with whatever I chose, but as she has matured, I have noticed she is losing interest in designs that feel baby or kid like to her. Hello tween years! How did they seem to sneak up on me!?!


I recently got the opportunity to test an update to the Ellie and Mac Cold Shoulder top pattern, and I absolutely loved the enthusiasm she had when I asked her if she wanted a cold shoulder top. She loved everything about the pattern and quickly picked out a fabric I had been hoarding for myself to be her top. She told me that she has wanted a top exactly like this for forever.  


The Pattern

The Girls' Cold Shoulder Pattern was originally released in June of 2017. The version that I tested this past month is an update to that pattern. The updated version is slimmer through the bodice and is not as long as the original. Also, the neckline is more modest. The basic features are the same, though. You can sew it with a ruffle that is gathered along the bottom, or you can simply hem the bottom and wear it as a top. All versions include the shoulder cut outs. The size range on this pattern is 2T to 12. I made a size 10 based on her measurements. To ensure that the bands laid properly for the neckline and cold shoulders, I measured and calculated them at 85% of the opening. 



The Fabric

The fabric that I used for her top is a double brushed polyester from Knitpop. As her tween style is evolving, she seems to be gravitating to fabrics that I like and away from all the kid prints in my stash. I guess this is all the more reason to buy more fabric? She looks really pretty in this floral so I am glad she picked it! 


Time to Gather

This top took me about 2 hours to sew (in shifts!). The longest part is gathering for me. I usually run a straight stitch along the ruffle with my stitch length set at the highest for my machine. I just do one row of stitching on the front and then another row for the back. I then put the shirt in my "to do stack" to take with me while I am in the homeschool room with the kids the next day. To do the gathering, I pull my bobbin thread on the top of the ruffle until it matches the bottom of the shirt. I make sure to match the side seams and the middle of the front and back. Then, I clip like crazy. This makes it go really quick when I am back at my sewing machine later that night.

While I am sitting at our homeschool table, I can give each of my older children their instructions on whatever subject they are working on and make sure the 4 year old has a stack of paper, glue, and crayons. The baby is usually napping or crawling around us. Then, I go through my stack of "to do" projects, which is usually a stack of patterns to tape together, stitches to be ripped, or ruffles to be gathered. This helps make me more efficient with my time when I do get to sew in my office, which is usually late in the evening once the house is quiet. Also, it is a bonus for the kids for me to have occupied hands because I stay available right where they are. It is a great way to hover close without being too close. I have learned that if I instruct and then walk away, they will walk away too, which makes for a long school day. 


If you have a little girl or tween who would want a Cold Shoulder Top, the pattern can be found here. If you have already purchased this pattern, you can get the update by re-downloading the pattern from your account at Ellie and Mac.

Thank you so much for reading my blog, and I hope I have inspired you! You may follow me on Instagram or receive updates by liking my page on Facebook. If you want to take a look into the things that inspire me, you can follow me on Pinterest. You may also follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Disclosures: This post may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small compensation when you purchase via my link. There is no cost to you, and it allows me to continue to tell you all about my latest favorite sewing finds.  

Photo Credit: my wonderful friend, Aimee Wilson

I was also getting photos of the Gemma top on the same day, so Abby and I got photos together. I absolutely love that I have these memories. So, here is a wonderful photo overload of memories of us goofing off. 







The Gemma Twist Top - PDF Sewing Pattern Review of the Designer Stitch Gemma Top

Give me mustard fabric plus a dolman top with a twist, and I am one happy girl. I am new to Designer Stitch patterns so I was excited to try out my first pattern from them, and I was even more excited when I saw that it was a fun dolman top. My friend Aimee has been telling me how much she loves testing for Ann Grose, the designer behind Designer Stitch, so I had to see what all the hype was about.


Today's post is going to be all about Designer Stitch's newest release, the Gemma top, and I have some sweet photos of Aimee and I together. Be forewarned, though, it had rained for about 4 days straight when we took these photos. Add wind into this equation, and my hair was absolutely uncooperative and crazy. 


The Gemma Twist Tops Pattern

The Gemma pattern contains two different top patterns: a twist front and a twist back. I made the twist front for testing. The twist front has a two piece back and a clever twist right in the middle of the bottom front. The neckline uses binding to finish it, and it is low enough for me to pull down to nurse in. The twist back has a sweeping v in the back and a tie to keep the top on your shoulders. Both tops have a large batwing dolman sleeves that is very comfortable. 


Sizing

I made a size 2 based on my measurements. The top fits busts that measure 32 to 52 inches, waist 23.5 to 43.5 inches, and hips from 34 to 54 inches. I made no adjustments to the pattern. The pattern calls for 1 and 1/8 yard of fabric for my size. I was able to squeeze my top out of a yard because of the 2 piece back and having a non-directional print. I cut one back piece going the other direction so that I could fit it all in. 


This pattern was a rather quick sew and I loved the results. The neckline is a very soft V that does not require the traditional focus and skill that a traditional v-neck does. I think this pattern is very beginner friendly and that the instructions were very thorough. It is a perfect pattern for those who are knew to sewing knit fabric. I think the binding was really quick to do on the neckline. The pattern recommends hand stitching your twist together on more slippery fabric so that it does not come apart. I used double brushed poly and found my twist wanted to slide apart so I safety pinned it down until I had the time to hand stitch it down. 


Resources

Pattern: Gemma Twist Top
Fabric: A double brushed polyester from Wherehouse Fabrics Dallas. 

Now, for the fun part. I love when I get to do pattern tests with Aimee. It usually means we get to take photos together and laugh and crack each other up. I have to try really hard to focus and make sure we both end up with decent pictures. I also have a hard time being quiet long enough and being serious. She made a Gemma in the same view as I did out of the coolest gem fabric. 


I love my friend Aimee. My serger broke last weekend. I absolutely cried. I don't even know what happened to it, but it just did not go. I had a birthday party to go to that afternoon so I ran by a local shop on the way to see if there was a simple fix or if their repairman was available. He had left for a 2 week vacation the day before. The other repair place that was a bit further was not open until Tuesday. I frantically messaged Aimee, and she let me borrow one of her back up sergers. I mean. Who does that?!? So, my serger is in the shop, and let us all pray it is an easy fix. In the mean time, I don't quite know how to express just how grateful I am for Aimee!! 


Here we are trying our hardest to listen to Ann's instructions to look sexy. I think I love the smiles even more!


Thank you so much for reading my blog! I hope I have inspired you! You may follow me on Instagram or receive updates by liking my page on Facebook. If you want to take a look into the things that inspire me, you can follow me on Pinterest.

Photo Credit: my wonderful friend, Aimee Wilson.

Disclosures: I received this pattern for free as part of the testing process to give the designer feedback about the instructions and fit of the pattern. This post also may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small compensation when you purchase via my link. There is no cost to you.  Any and all opinions expressed are my own.






Wednesday, August 22, 2018

The Itch to Stitch Dana Point Top





I made a reversible top that is awesome for breastfeeding!! I hope you can feel my excitement. When I saw the tester call for the Dana Point Top pattern by Itch to Stitch, I quickly jumped on it. I just love the style of this top. The Dana Point Top is drafted to be a sleeveless, fully lined, button up blouse with pleats at the waist and shoulders. It has a v-neckline and is wonderful for lightweight cotton woven fabric. The pattern has cup sizes up to DD and has bust darts for cups C through DD. After I tell you my thoughts on the pattern, I will talk about how easy it is to make reversible.

PDF Sewing Top Button Up Woven Sleeveless Blouse

The Pattern


The Dana Point top is a pdf sewing pattern for bust sizes 30 to 49 inches, waist 25 to 40.5 inches, and hips 33 to 48 inches. My measurements put me in a size 0 for bust and waist with a D cup and a size 2 for hips. I normally would grade out from a size 0 at my waist to a size two at my hips in an Itch to Stitch pattern, but this pattern is flared already at the hips so I made a straight 0 and did not grade.

This pattern has 36 pleats and 4 darts (if you are cups C-DD). The pleats definitely took some time, but they are so worth it for the waist definition they give. My advice on the pleats is to mark them on the wrong side of your fabric and use a bunch of pins to keep them in place if using slippery fabric.

PDF Sewing Top Button Up Woven Sleeveless Blouse
PDF Sewing Pattern Woven Button Up Sleeveless Blouse

Fit

I made a quick, unlined muslin out of quilting cotton to check fit. The quilting cotton will later be cut up and put in a quilt. It will definitely tent and not give you the look you want on this pattern. If you have a sway back, you will have more poof at the top of the back pleats and need to adjust your pattern piece. I had the perfect amount of ease and did not need to adjust.

I absolutely adore the finished silhouette of this pattern. I wore it to dinner with some girlfriends this past weekend and felt so put together! I think the slight flair at the bottom hides a big meal very easily, while the waist pleats keep you looking trim.




PDF Sewing Pattern Sleeveless Button Up Top
Itch to Stitch Dana Point Top Pattern

It's Reversible!

For the lining, I used some very soft fabric that has been in my stash for quite some time. I never found the perfect project for it because it is slightly sheer, rather shifty, and looks like a hard print to match up. I probably bought it because I love the colors and loved how soft it felt next to my skin. I thought it would work perfect for lining because no one would ever see it! So, I really did not stress too much about matching the print or making sure the print was placed right. When I finished the top and tried it on, though, I surprisingly absolutely loved how the lining turned out too! So, when I was hemming my top, I did not hem my lining as the instructions detailed. Rather, I folded the hem of the main fabric over to catch and sandwich the lining fabric's edge. The print is busy enough that I don't think it is so noticeable that I have a strip of my main fabric at the bottom. If you wanted to make it without that strip, you would need to cut your lining fabric out to be the same length as your main fabric and hem them at the same time (the lining is just a bit shorter than the front so it doesn't accidentally hang lower than the main fabric).

To further make it reversible, I used black kam snaps as my closure instead of buttons and button holes. Kam snaps are pretty quick to install, and I like the way they look on this top. They also make nursing a baby even quicker because I don't have to fidget with buttons while holding a crying baby.

Pleated Sleeveless Top Sewing Pattern

Here is how the back turned out on the lining. Not too bad for how uncooperative this fabric was!

Itch to Stitch Dana Point Top

Resources

Pattern: Dana Point Top by Itch to Stitch. Pattern will be on sale for a week to celebrate it's release. The volume discount still applies: Spend $20 or more to get 15% off, or spend $30 or more to get 20% off your entire cart

Main shirt fabric: Anna Maria Horner Fibs and Fables Starry Eyed Rayon Challis

Lining Fabric: a remnant found at Wherehouse Fabrics in Dallas. This is a great place to shop if you are ever in Dallas.

Snaps: Black Kam Snaps, Color B5, Size 20


Thank you so much for reading my blog! I hope I have inspired you! You may follow me on Instagram or receive updates by liking my page on Facebook. If you want to take a look into the things that inspire me, you can follow me on Pinterest.

Photo Credit: my sweet 9 year, Abigail.

Disclosures: I received this pattern for free as part of the testing process to give the designer feedback about the instructions and fit of the pattern. This post also may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small compensation when you purchase via my link. There is no cost to you. Any and all opinions expressed are my own.



Monday, August 20, 2018

Bespoke Briefs Blog Tour - Sewing the Thread Faction Ladies Knickers

Welcome to the Bespoke Briefs Blog Tour!! I am your stop for Tuesday, and I am so excited to share the undies that I have been sewing recently with you. You can call them panties, undies, knickers, underwear, and so many other names, but my favorite term for them in this blogpost will be undies. I have been making my own undies for several years now and have used a pattern that I heavily modified for myself. I still felt like my pattern had a ways to go for perfection, so I quickly signed up when I saw the knickers blogger tour. I am excited to tell you that this pattern is a total win for me! 


Pattern #202 for Ladies Undies is a medium rise hipster pattern with the option of using FOE, picot elastic, or knit fabric bands to finish the legs and waist openings. The pattern comes in sizes XXS-XXL, which covers hip sizes 32.5 to 49.5 inches. I made a size XS. My hip measurement is 36, which put me at the top end of XS. I did not make any adjustments to the pattern. The instructions were very thorough. I believe a beginner who does not own a serger and does not normally sew with knit fabric could easily make these following the pattern. 


I quickly made 4 pairs of undies since these are perfect for scrap busting. I have to admit, though, that when I finished, the reality set in that I had AGREED to blog about panties. I have modeled panties once before and have modeled and blogged about several swimsuits so I assured myself I have the guts to do this. So, be kind. I am a mom of 5 (ranging from 7 months to 9 years), and I am willing to show you a underwear pattern that absolutely won my heart. 


The Thread Faction #202 panty pattern has the side seam towards the front. This means that the front color blocking comes out very pretty since you get a peak of the back at the front. The liner seams are completely enclosed and is very cleverly done. I made this pair with a knit waistband and think the rise is perfect on me. It is just high enough for comfort but low enough that it does not show on the back of my pants. 


I used picot elastic on the leg opening of all my panties. I also used it on the waist of the next pair of panties, and it was just as comfortable as the knit waistband. 


I love the coverage on these panties. They are the perfect compromise of comfort and sexy. The main issue that I have with undies is coverage in the area between the butt and the crotch. If that area is too narrow, I will have to pick wedgies all day long. However, this one has the perfect width for my comfort in that area without feeling like granny panties. 


I used a 3/4 inch soft plush elastic for this pair and a kid's panel that I found in my stash. It made me giggle to  use it for undies. The 3/4 inch plush elastic is much more firm than the knit bands, so if I use it again, I will add an inch or two for the waistband measurement for comfort. 


I normally only make undies out of cotton lycra, but a sweet friend of mine is always telling me that her favorite panties are made in athletic brushed poly. She sent me a scrap of butterflies, and I have to admit, these panties are very nice! 


Resources 
  • The Thread Faction panty pattern can be purchased here
  • The 3/8 inch picot elastic for the leg openings came from Lace and Trims on Etsy. I love to buy their grab bags of 20 yards. They always come with very pretty colors and are soft and perfect for elastic. 
  • The 3/4 inch plush picot trim for the waistband on my "classic" panel panties came from Simply by Ti, and comes in a few other colors and can be found here
  • The solids and striped knit fabrics came from Made Whimsy.
  • The kitty cat fabric came from Dark Matter Fabric
  • The jellyfish fabric came from Jumping June Textiles.
  • The butterfly fabric came from Zenith and Quasar

Thanks for stopping by and reading my post for my day of the blog tour. I hope I have inspired you! You may follow me on Instagram or receive updates by liking my page on Facebook. If you want to take a look into the things that inspire me, you can follow me on Pinterest.

Here is the tour schedule so that you can follow along with the other bloggers on the tour: 


August 20

August 21

August 22

August 23

August 24

August 25


Disclosures: This post also may contain affiliate links, which means I receive a small compensation when you purchase via my link. There is no cost to you.  Any and all opinions expressed are my own.